Klawock

Láwaak

The paved Scenic Byways of P.O.W. Island intersect in Klawock– south to Craig, east to Hollis and the ferry terminal, and north to communities on the northern half of the Island. Explore the rich Tlingit history and traditions in Totem Park where you can see 21 poles, explore the heritage center, and watch local carvers. An excellent site for fishing, Klawock is historically known for being a fishing village and the site of Alaska’s first salmon cannery. For more information on activities, accommodations, and planning your trip click the link below.

Getting Here

Get here by plane or boat. Smaller regional airlines like Alaska Seaplanes fly to Prince of Wales Island. The Alaska Marine Highway System (ferry), the Inter-Island Ferry Authority, and regional boat operators also provide transportation to and from the island.

The “Crossroads” of Prince Of Wales Island

The paved Scenic Byways of P.O.W. Island intersect in Klawock– south to Craig, east to Hollis and the ferry terminal, and north to communities on the northern half of the Island. Explore the rich Tlingit history and traditions in Totem Park where you can see 21 poles, explore the heritage center, and watch local carvers. An excellent site for fishing, Klawock is historically known for being a fishing village and the site of Alaska’s first salmon cannery. For more information on activities, accommodations, and planning your trip click the link below.

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Wildfish Cannery

Alaska's favorite cult flavors.

Founded in 1987, Wildfish Cannery smokes and cans wild Alaska seafood, carrying on the craft and time-honored traditions of the region in the small seaside town of Klawock. With his background as a chef, owner and grandson of the founder, Mathew Scaletta takes great pride in working closely with fishermen

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